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Vaccine Information and Planning


COVID-19 Vaccination in Indiana

Anyone age 6 months and older may receive the safe, effective and free COVID-19 vaccine. The U.S. FDA has also authorized bivalent booster doses of COVID-19 vaccine for anyone age 5 and older. For booster vaccination, CDC recommends eligible people age 5 and older receive an age-appropriate, updated Pfizer or Moderna vaccine that offers better protection against variants.

The updated bivalent Moderna booster for people age 6 and older and the updated bivalent Pfizer booster for people age 5 and older are available at hundreds of sites listed on the COVID-19 Our Shot Map. Select a site that says it's offering the bivalent booster in the details or select a site in the "Bivalent Booster Dose" drop down list. You can also call 211 (866-211-9966) to make an appointment or walk-in appointments are available at any IDOH mobile clinic.

People age 5 and older should get the bivalent booster two months after either their primary dose or most recent booster dose. Eligible individuals can get either the Pfizer or Moderna updated booster, regardless of which primary dose they received.

Sites that offer primary and/or booster vaccines to a pediatric age group are marked with a pin on the site map, with more details included on the site’s specific pop-up information. Zoom out on the map to expand your search.

Enter your ZIP code in the Indiana Department of Health’s (IDOH’s) registration system to find several vaccination locations near you. Scroll to see the site you selected on the map. The site’s information will include which vaccine is likely available at the site. You can click “Find Next Available Appointment” to get to the soonest date and time. If you don’t see the vaccination site you’re looking for, it’s possible that all appointments are full.

You may want to verify availability in advance by calling the site or contacting your healthcare provider. Schedule online or call Indiana 211 (866-211-9966) if you would like help making an appointment.

Please note that the FDA has also issued a statement limiting the authorized use of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) vaccine to anyone 18 years of age and older if other approved vaccines are not available or clinically appropriate, and they would otherwise not get vaccinated. The FDA has also replaced the authorization of the monovalent Moderna and Pfizer booster vaccines with the newer bivalent booster vaccines.

Check the CDC website for more vaccine information.

Already received the vaccine? Make sure you sign up for the v-safe after-vaccination health checker.

Get your vaccination certificate

If you’ve been vaccinated, connect with the Indiana Vaccination Portal to get your vaccination certificate using Access Indiana.
Click here then on the tile "Indiana Vaccination Portal"

Have a question about COVID-19 vaccine? Search our Frequently Asked Questions.

To filter the FAQ lists below, please type in a keyword or phrase in the search field. Once you start typing the lists below will show only relevant results.

Vaccine Safety

Vaccine Scheduling and Registration

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Your Vaccination

Other Vaccine Questions



About the vaccine

Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, Novavax and Johnson & Johnson vaccines have received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), and additional vaccines are being developed by other manufacturers. The EUA process has allowed for clinical trials and manufacturing to occur simultaneously, while still allowing for rigorous testing to determine how safe and effective it is.

Safety is top priority.
The first goal is to focus on the safety of the vaccine and determining how effective it is. Before any vaccine is released, it must first complete three phases of clinical trials to study its effect on thousands of diverse study participants. Once that study is done, the pharmaceutical company submits the results for Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. FDA. This is a way to make important health breakthroughs available to the public quickly.

The vaccine is then reviewed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). ACIP is a federal advisory committee of medical and public health experts who develop recommendations on the use of vaccines in the U.S. public.

The CDC recommends the Moderna, Novavax and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines. For booster vaccination, CDC recommends eligible people 5 and older receive an age-appropriate, updated Pfizer or Moderna vaccine that offers better protection against variants. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is authorized for anyone age 18 and older if no other approved vaccine is available because of a slightly increased risk for a rare but serious blood clotting disorder. Most people who developed these blood clots and low levels of platelets were females ages 18 through 49 years. Symptoms typically began one to two weeks following vaccination, and no cases occurred more than 30 days following vaccination. The chance of this occurring is remote. You should seek medical attention right away if you have any of the following symptoms after receiving Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) COVID-19 vaccine:

  • Severe or persistent headaches or blurred vision
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Leg swelling
  • Persistent abdominal pain
  • Easy bruising or tiny blood spots under the skin beyond the site of the injection
  • V-Safe Information Sheet (English) (Spanish) (Chinese) (Korean) (Vietnamese)

Vaccine is available near you. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are available for anyone 6 months and older, and the Novavax vaccine is available for anyone age 12 and older. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is authorized for anyone age 18 and older if no other approved vaccine is available.

Vaccines by Pfizerclick here for Spanish version ), Moderna (click here for Spanish version), Novavax (click here for Spanish version) and Johnson & Johnson (click here for Spanish version) are now available. COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for all people 6 months and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding, trying to get pregnant now, or might become pregnant in the future. Evidence about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy has been growing. These data suggest that the benefits of receiving a COVID-19 vaccine outweigh any known or potential risks of vaccination during pregnancy.

Already received the vaccine? Make sure you’re on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s v-safe after vaccination health checker.

Vaccine is free. Your insurance may be billed an administration fee, but patients will not be charged.

Everyone, regardless of vaccination status, should take precautions after exposure to COVID-19.

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This site was last updated Nov 10, 2022 10:51 PM